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Kate Fennell - holistic therapist PDF Print E-mail
Tuesday, 23 June 2015

Kate Fennell - massage therapist
Name / Adınız Soyadiniz
Kate Fennell

Occupation / Mesleğiniz
Holistic Therapist/ Event Manager

Originally from / Doğum yeriniz
An island off Connemara in the west of Ireland.

Family / Evlimisiniz ve çocuğunuz varmi
Mummy to my daughter Anu who is 20 months old.

What time do you get up? / Saat kaçta uyanırsınız
Between 8 and 9a.m when Anu stands on the bed and sticks her nose to the window to say 'meme' to the goats grazing outside.

What’s for breakfast? / Kahvaltıda ne seversiniz
Hot water and lemon, fruit, home-made yoghurt, cheese, toast, filter coffee and tahin/pekmez.

What time do you start work? / Saat kaçta çalışmaya başlarsiniz
If I'm working from home in Gökseki, I usually start at 11a.m.  But if I am working in Kalkan I leave the house at 9a.m.

What time do you stop work? / Saat kaçta işiniz biter
Usually about 6pm if it's a full day's work, 8pm for an extra long day.

How long have you done your current job? / Yaptiğiniz işi ne zamandir yapıyorsunuz
I've been doing Massage, Reiki and Reflexology for over 15 years but professionally for the last four years.  It started out as a hobby and doing courses little by little.  Nobody's bare feet, shoulders or back were safe beside me because I would always end up massaging them!

I was working in television production at the time which was full on and I just couldn't see how I would make the transition to being a massage therapist and would I survive?  So when I moved to Kaş four years ago I took the opportunity to try it out in a friend's salon and the response was really positive and I've been doing it ever since.  I worked two summers in Kabak near Fethiye and one year in Istanbul in between.

I studied Classical Civilisation and Russian in University in Dublin and so had been fascinated by Byzantium - that's what first brought me to Turkey.  I planned to explore Istanbul for three months just after I graduated but I ended up staying for eight.  I really loved the city.

To escape the Istanbul rain though I went to the south on holiday and discovered Butterfly Valley and the Turquoise Coast.  That started a love affair with the south.

When I returned to Ireland I pretty much landed a job straight away in television through simply doing an interview and every break I had I would return to Butterfly valley, turn off my phone and swallow up the silence and serenity of the area.  An absolute need when you work in the fast-paced media.

After 10 years in television I then began producing festivals but was getting really fed up with the constant Irish rain so decided to move to the south of Turkey full-time.

In Kas I organised an Irish film festival which was warmly received and I've been organising Irish music events in Istanbul and the Black Sea since.  The fact that I got to develop my massage and healing therapies here as well has been a really great gift.  I don't know if it would have happened at home somehow. 

What’s the best thing about your job? / Yaptiniz işte en sevdiği şey nedir
I love the transformation it can bring about in people.  People get actually healed through several sessions or sometimes just one.  I treat anything from lower back pain to sciatica to migraines.  Because I incorporate Reiki into every session it really leaves them relaxed and they sometimes nod off.  Very often they say they haven't felt that relaxed in years.  It's a gift to be able to give that to someone.  I like the simplicity of it.  It's just hands and the body and so much goodness comes out if it.

Describe a typical day /  Bir gününüzün nasıl geçtini anlatirmisiniz
At the moment I either work in Kaş or Kalkan.  If it is in Kalkan I usually do long days and receive my first customer at 10 a.m.  I leave my daughter Anu with her minder in Gökseki and off I go with portable massage table in tow.

I've built up some clients in Kalkan over the last few months and they recommend others after a session so I usually have about 6 or 7 customers in one day there.  It's a lot but I space them out so that it's not too tough and we are not rushed.  It's important for the client to feel that you have time and that they can take their time after the session getting up and ask any questions if they need to.  Sometimes they can be in la-la land after a session and need some time to come back to earth.  On a day like that I will usually return to Kaş at about 9.30p.m. feeling tired but happy.

In Kaş, people come to my home starting from 11 a.m.  I have many regular clients here and then during the summer season many of the hotels send their clients to me.  I usually have time to go for a swim with my Anu and friends during the day and finish latest at 7p.m.

Do the seasons make a difference with your work?  If so, how? /  Yazın işinizde değişiklik oluyormu? Oluyorsa anlatın?
Winter is very quiet in terms of massage customers so I usually work on my other jobs .

I'm an ex-TV producer and a festival and events organiser.  I organised a festival of Irish film in Kaş, a festival of Irish music in Istanbul and Irish music concerts for St. Patrick's day.  I bring the musicians from Ireland and raise funding for it.  It's very time-consuming and not easy in Turkey but I love it.  I like to mix cultures and have them learn from each other and see what comes from the fusion.  It breaks down barriers and promotes understanding while at the same time creating a lot of fun.

We've had superb events in Istanbul, Kaş and at a Black Sea music festival with Irish and Turkish pipers piping late into the night.  I try to do one event or festival in the year.  If anyone has any ideas for any events you're always welcome to contact me.

What makes you happy? /  Sizi en çok ne mutlu eder
Smelling the intoxicating scents of summer down my road here in Gökseki in the evenings.  All the nature around from the mountains to the sea.  Seeing the veg and flowers growing in my young garden.

Swimming in the sea with Anu and seeing the glee on her little face as she kicks for her life.  A long chat and nice wine with friends on the balcony.  Doing a great day of massage where everyone is feeling blissed out. 

Seeing one of my festivals or events coming to fruition.  Writing great articles and getting them published (which I manage to do from time to time!)

If you were not doing this job, what else would you like to do? /  Şu anki yaptiğiniz işi yapmıyor olsaydiniz ne iş yapmek isterdiniz
Run a retreat centre in the west of Ireland with lots of workshops and activities.  And with a large roof overhead to protect us from the rain.

What music do you like to listen to? / Hangi müziği dinlemeyi seviyorsunuz?
At the moment it's Faada Freddy's album.  I recommend it.  Anu dances to it non-stop.

If you could meet anyone in the world, living or dead, who would it be, and why? / Eğer dünyada yaşayan yada yaşamayan herhangi biriyle tanışmanız mümkün olsaydı onun kim olmasını isterdiniz?
Cengiz Han or Genghis Khan as we know him in English.  I would love to know what he thinks of his legacy.

Tell us something about yourself that not many people know. /  Kendinizle ilgili bir çok insanın bilmediği bir şeyi anlatırmısınız
I speak Irish to my daughter, not English.  People expect that because I am from Ireland and speak English that that is what Anu and I speak.  But I didn't speak English till I was 7 since we grew up on an island in a part of Ireland where there was no English spoken at the time.  Television changed all that.  Now it's hard to bring your children up in Irish even in an Irish-speaking part of Ireland but it's important of course that we keep the language.  Anu currently says a few words in Irish and Turkish and says yes in Russian!  For anyone interested in bilingualism in children I blog on it at irishspeakingbaby.blogspot.com

Anything else / Başka her hangi birşey
This summer I'm available to come to people's villas for the day and do massage for 4 to 6 customers.  It can be a nice day for ladies to get together and have a bit of pampering with the pool not far away.

All my contact details are at www.hierosgamosistanbul.weebly.com

You can find me on Facebook at Hieros Gamos Holistics

 

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Last Updated on Tuesday, 23 June 2015